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All that Jazz by Frankie Morone.

Narration by Frankie Morone.

Circa 1808, the Atlantic slave trade had brought almost half a million Africans to the United States. Those slaves came mostly from Western counties of the African Continent and they brought with them strong tribal musical traditions.(Similarly in our own country Haiti, they brought their Vaudou rituals). Lavish and beautiful festivals, featuring African dances to drums were organized on Sundays at Place Congo, or Congo Square, in New Orleans until circa 1843. There were similar gatherings in New England and even New York.Believe or not, African music was largely functional, for work or ritual, and included work songs and field hollers. The African tradition made use of a single-line melody and call-and-response pattern, but without the European concept of harmony. Rhythms reflected African speech patterns, and the African use of pentatonic scales led to blue notes in blues and jazz.

In the early 19th century, an increasing number of black musicians learned to play European instruments, particularly the violin, which they used to parody European dance music in their own cakewalk dances. In turn, European-American minstrel show performers in blackface popularized such music internationally, combining syncopation with European harmonic accompaniment. Louis Moreau Gottschalk adapted African-American cakewalk music, South American, Caribbean and other slave melodies as piano salon music. Another influence came from black slaves who had learned the harmonic style of hymns and incorporated it into their own music as spirituals.

The origins of the blues are undocumented.

While jazz may be difficult to define, improvisation is clearly one of its key elements.Nowadays we have a whole array of jazz music: For instance Latin Jazz and quite few more.
Early blues was commonly structured around a repetitive call-and-response pattern, a common element in the African American oral tradition....

I have found these old pictures of various Jazz musicians. I was really pleased to see them. I have saved them in my hard drive for the longest time and I finally decided to share them with the viewers of PIKLIZ. At Pikliz we strive to bring you the best of the best.

Enjoy them.

Slideshow
Billie Holiday
1
Billie Holiday
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Billie Holiday .
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Billie Holiday .
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Billie Holiday .
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Billie Holiday .
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Billie Holiday Sound of Jazz Cover
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Billie Holiday Sound of Jazz Cover
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Billie Holliday.
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Billie Holliday.
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Billie Holliday.
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Billie Holliday.
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Billie Holiday 1917
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Billie Holiday 1917
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Billie Holiday's husband.
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Billie Holiday's husband.
207 views
 
Billie Holiday.
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Billie Holiday.
199 views
 
Gleen miller
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Gleen miller
217 views
 
Billie Holiday.
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Billie Holiday.
145 views
 
Billie Holiday
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Billie Holiday
146 views
 
Billie Holiday.
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Billie Holiday.
143 views
 
Billie Holiday
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Billie Holiday
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Billie Holiday.
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Billie Holiday.
136 views
 
Billie Holiday.
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Billie Holiday.
146 views
 
Art Blakey
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Art Blakey
149 views
 
Billy Eckstine
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Billy Eckstine
155 views
 
Billy Strayhorn
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Billy Strayhorn
136 views
 
Brown & Roach
20
Brown & Roach
116 views
 
Bud Powell
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Bud Powell
112 views
 
Charlie Parker
22
Charlie Parker
94 views
 
Chet Baker
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Chet Baker
92 views
 
John Coltrane.
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John Coltrane.
106 views